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YES that Mad Bastard Bielsa's brand of football IS good enough for Leeds United

Posted: Fri Jun 15, 2018 7:49 am
by jackos
Kicking this off even thought it's not been announced by the club - Phil Hay gets the honour of starting a thread that we all hope will end up with us in the PL but could just as well end up with us bankrupt.

HERE WE GO WITH LEEDS UNITED!!

“Paris is worth a mass.” It was those apocryphal words, used on Monday by somebody close to Marcelo Bielsa, which erased all doubt about Bielsa’s intentions. For Paris, read Leeds United; different empires, different men but the same romantic appeal. The quote harks back to the 1500s and the reign of Henry IV of France, who converted to Catholicism in the hope of ending a bloody, religious civil war. Conversion, he supposedly said, was a small price to pay if it allowed him to govern the country and run it as he pleased. Paris is worth a mass. Marcelo Bielsa.

Bielsa, from the point of his first conversation with Leeds, knew what he wanted and expressed himself frankly. Conversations about contracts and work permits were torturously painstaking and often aloof but on training methods, recruitment and his own levels of authority, Bielsa made ears burn. He knew in advance about the set-up at Thorp Arch and had analysed the club’s squad minutely. He watched every one of this season’s games and other key matches involving rival clubs in the Championship. It will go like this, Bielsa said, as football dominated finance.

Leeds were coming for him, not the other way round, and his reputation, his value and his aura gave him all the cards to play. As discussions and paperwork went back and forward, Bielsa kept himself in South America and embarked on a series of lectures at football conferences in Mexico and Uruguay. There was no rush to leap into United’s arms but all the while he was privately open to compromise and minded to do what was necessary to make the job at Elland Road his. Paris is worth a mass. Bielsa accepts offer to become Leeds United head coach

It surprised Leeds to find him so receptive when contact was first made. The initial conversation took place before the club dismissed Paul Heckingbottom on June 1 and left Heckingbottom hanging by a thread. His position as head coach was already precarious but Bielsa’s willingness to talk and talk at length was another nail in the incumbent’s coffin; proof that another way could be found and that Heckingbottom’s quintessential Championship management could be replaced with a more flamboyant, sexy blueprint; a coach depicted as the godfather of modern, intellectual football.

Victor Orta, Leeds’ director of football, knew Bielsa of old and did the early spadework to establish a meeting with Andrea Radrizzani, the first leg of an exhausting relay in which paperwork and phone calls bounced back and forward. Angus Kinnear, the club’s managing director, travelled with Orta to Argentina late last month and, after four days of discussions, established that Bielsa’s demands were financially viable. He will earn between £2m and £3m, nothing like the £8m-a-year he was paid by Lille in his last job, but Leeds in all their 99 years have never committed to a higher wage for a head coach.

So what drew Bielsa to England and murderball in the Championship? A 62-year-old who speaks no English and has lived his long managerial life in more salubrious environments than the EFL? For the past few weeks those involved in the process of hiring him, on both sides, have spoken of one thing: romanticism. This, in a sense, is a veteran coach returning to his roots; retreating from Lille, Marseille, Athletic Bilbao and the bright lights of international football to rediscover his first love, Newell’s Old Boys.

Bielsa walks on water at Newell’s, the club in Rosario, Argentina where he was born and where he began coaching in earnest in the 1990s. His siblings are politicians and architects but football caught his imagination and he fashioned a short playing career at Newell’s. As manager, Bielsa took them in hand, delivered trophies and gave the club a lease of life. The job inspired his ferocious work ethic and tactical mind, bringing about the birth of 3-3-1-3 and engendering the innovative, daring ideas which coaches would flock to emulate. “It’s impossible for me to love another shirt more than that of Newell’s,” Bielsa once said. In 2009 the club reciprocated by naming their stadium after him.

Leeds, 7,000 miles away, pull at the same string: a proud but downtrodden club who have wasted years looking for enlightenment. They will not name Elland Road after Bielsa but there is infinite esteem to be found here for whoever drags Leeds off the Championship roundabout. The club appealed and England appealed and there was never any disagreement about money. Bielsa only wanted to satisfy his fanaticism for employing his principles of coaching and to make sure that Leeds would give him the freedom.

This appointment will still cost the club, as the appointment of Bielsa has cost other clubs in the past. It became apparent to Leeds that Bielsa was seriously interested when the demands about players and methods of working began coming their way. He wanted an earlier start date for pre-season, giving him time to drum his philosophy into their squad, and asked for modifications at Thorp Arch. Bielsa has done this before. At Lille he persuaded the club to build 20 apartments at their training ground to allow players to work there, recover there and sleep there. “Hardcore,” was how winger Anwar El Ghazi described Lille’s pre-season. Even before Bielsa’s appointment was finalised, United’s squad were told to prepare themselves for three weeks of double sessions. They can expect to spend the next month living in each other’s pockets and to find Bielsa fully versed in the mess which this season became.

Lille, though, is a cautionary tale for anyone assuming that Bielsa is a golden ticket to the Premier League. The most unique appointment Leeds have ever made is laced with risk, embracing a maverick and volatile man who has burned out spectacularly in the past. Bielsa, who quit Lazio in 2016 after two days in charge having accused the club of failing to keep up their end of the bargain on transfers, was the pick of new Lille owner Gerard Lopez last summer, at a cost of £8m a year. Lille threw more than £50m at their squad and invested in infrastructure at Bielsa’s request but were strangely lifeless under Bielsa. Results turned against him quickly and devotion to his philosophy allowed no room for pragmatism. As one journalist put it: “There was no prospect of their coach altering his principles just to have square pegs fit in square holes.”

Bielsa was suspended in November and later sacked after flying to Chile to visit an ill friend in hospital. Lille classed it an unauthorised trip away. The Argentinian took action against the club and claimed an eye-watering sum in compensation, well in excess of £10m after six months in charge. That legal case is ongoing and according to reports in France he lost the last round of it in March.

Volatility and an unpredictable streak come as part of the package. He has nurtured certain players, upset others and seen squads wilt over time from the high-octane demands of his football. He rarely sticks in one place for long. In 2015 he resigned from Marseille without any warning, one game into the new season. “I’ve finished my work here,” he told a room of incredulous journalists. “I will return to my country.” An interpreter was then told to read out sections of his resignation letter, received by Marseille’s hierarchy minutes earlier. ‘El Loco’, the crazy one, lived up to his nickname. Leeds cannot say there weren’t warned.

But there is brilliance in Bielsa’s methods, an imagination which showed itself in his two years with Athletic Bilbao and their run to the Europa League final. Manchester United were picked off in the process, made to look pedestrian as Bilbao raised their flag over Old Trafford in 2012. Though largely undecorated, he spawned what Tottenham manager Mauricio Pochettino called “a generation of coaches who were his disciples”, the most prominent being Pep Guardiola; coaches who believed in Bielsa’s free, attacking football, his devotion to style and, most importantly, his own mind. He might open doors to players at Tottenham and Manchester City, and potentially Arsenal where he has separate connections, as his devotees welcome him into the English game and make him at home. He will find some of his disciples here. Leeds are not investing in a coach. They are investing in a doctrine and a culture; the cult of Marcelo Bielsa.

Read more at: https://www.yorkshireeveningpost.co.uk/ ... -1-9207939

Re: Is that Mad Bastard Bielsa's brand of football good enough for Leeds United

Posted: Fri Jun 15, 2018 7:58 am
by Yeboah
No

Re: Is that Mad Bastard Bielsa's brand of football good enough for Leeds United

Posted: Fri Jun 15, 2018 8:02 am
by sunshine whites
"El Loco’, the crazy one, lived up to his nickname. Leeds cannot say there weren’t warned."

FM well that appointment is some statement, shirley he will be backed and the transfer window may be interesting

Re: Is that Mad Bastard Bielsa's brand of football good enough for Leeds United

Posted: Fri Jun 15, 2018 8:03 am
by jackos
I do love this tweet from the club


Re: Is that Mad Bastard Bielsa's brand of football good enough for Leeds United

Posted: Fri Jun 15, 2018 8:05 am
by JimbobMaloney
Bit early innit?

Team news?

Re: Is that Mad Bastard Bielsa's brand of football good enough for Leeds United

Posted: Fri Jun 15, 2018 8:05 am
by LSD&2Es
:cheers:

Re: Is that Mad Bastard Bielsa's brand of football good enough for Leeds United

Posted: Fri Jun 15, 2018 8:05 am
by sunshine whites
twatter
Bielsa: "When a club with Leeds United’s history made me an offer, it was impossible to turn down. I'm excited for the challenge ahead and I look forward to collaborating with Victor, Andrea and Angus as we work hard to achieve great things at this football club.”

Re: Is that Mad Bastard Bielsa's brand of football good enough for Leeds United

Posted: Fri Jun 15, 2018 8:07 am
by jackos
Two plus 1 then

‏@PhilHayYEP
BREAKING: Leeds United confirm appointment of Marcelo Bielsa as head coach. Two-year contract, with the option of a third year. #lufc

Re: Is that Mad Bastard Bielsa's brand of football good enough for Leeds United

Posted: Fri Jun 15, 2018 8:15 am
by Blackwhite
Yeboah wrote:No

:lol: :lol:


I for one welcome our new Loco Overlord.
Line by line that's about eighty percent "I just came" and twenty percent caution.

IMO for the sake of your health I'd assume we're taking your absolute disapproval as read...

Re: Is that Mad Bastard Bielsa's brand of football good enough for Leeds United

Posted: Fri Jun 15, 2018 8:18 am
by sunshine whites
beeb "fans will hope that he has, or is given, the players to execute successfully his high-pressing, high-octane 3-3-1-3 formation over a 46-game Championship campaign"

Re: Is that Mad Bastard Bielsa's brand of football good enough for Leeds United

Posted: Fri Jun 15, 2018 8:21 am
by eric olthwaite
I suspect that the thread title ought to be Is Leeds United’s brand of football good enough for that Mad Bastard Bielsa?

Re: Is that Mad Bastard Bielsa's brand of football good enough for Leeds United

Posted: Fri Jun 15, 2018 8:25 am
by LSD&2Es
sunshine whites wrote:beeb "fans will hope that he has, or is given, the players to execute successfully his high-pressing, high-octane 3-3-1-3 formation over a 46-game Championship campaign"


It's now that the import of 4,632 U23s last season makes sense

Re: Is that Mad Bastard Bielsa's brand of football good enough for Leeds United

Posted: Fri Jun 15, 2018 8:32 am
by dirty leeds
sunshine whites wrote:beeb "fans will hope that he has, or is given, the players to execute successfully his high-pressing, high-octane 3-3-1-3 formation over a 46-game Championship campaign"



That was Popey, wasn't it? You'd think, given the attention to detail Hay was on about [above], that the subject of players has already been discussed and wheels set in motion. Hence the Foyth rumours.

Look, I'd never heard of Bielsa until very recently. We've all read his history, know about his tactical innovations, his ups and downs, his mercurial character and a lot of us have probably seen some videos of how his teams play. I don't know if it will work at our level - it definitely does depend on how capable the players are of carrying out his instructions, so their physicality and football intelligence will be tested. If we assume they are working on bringing in the players he needs, then I'm very much wanting it to work out, dying to believe in it all. It could all go tits up, of course it could. But it's going to be a damn sight more interesting than whatever The Heck [or McCarthy or Bruce or whoever] would be coming up with. I really want to go with this thing and I hope all the fans [except Yeboah] get on the Bielsa Bus too.

I mean, how good would it be to go to Millwall, chase the fuckers off their own park, score two or three and leave 'em dazed and confused? For once.

Re: Is that Mad Bastard Bielsa's brand of football good enough for Leeds United

Posted: Fri Jun 15, 2018 8:36 am
by sunshine whites
Simon O'Rourke twattered, "I tweeted a couple of months back, AR seems to have activated #fuckitmode. Good. We've needed that. Our current league abuses the privilege of having us here, and the league above yearns for our return. I won't tag him, but God bless the little sod. AR isn't stupid."

Re: Is that Mad Bastard Bielsa's brand of football good enough for Leeds United

Posted: Fri Jun 15, 2018 8:38 am
by Top Cat Cooper
I was always told be wary if something is too good to be true as it probably is.

Re: Is that Mad Bastard Bielsa's brand of football good enough for Leeds United

Posted: Fri Jun 15, 2018 8:42 am
by welshwhite
Being the fickle cunt that I am, I now love Radz, Orta, and the rest of our regime :thumbl:

Fun times ahead :cheers:

Re: Is that Mad Bastard Bielsa's brand of football good enough for Leeds United

Posted: Fri Jun 15, 2018 8:58 am
by rss1969
We need a new influx of players that will influence the ones already here as at Wolves last year.

Saiz & Alioski waving cards and arms about is not what is required. Pontus will need a kick up the arse as well. We need a Wilko-esque change in attitude from the squad and that is going to mean new faces coming in.

Re: Is that Mad Bastard Bielsa's brand of football good enough for Leeds United

Posted: Fri Jun 15, 2018 9:55 am
by Vampire
Let the games begin.

Re: Is that Mad Bastard Bielsa's brand of football good enough for Leeds United

Posted: Fri Jun 15, 2018 10:15 am
by Arnieb
So I looked up biesla last night in Jonathan wilson's inverting the pyramid book on tactics. He gets about 6 pages which is as much as any other coach ever except for the hock of course.

Re: Is that Mad Bastard Bielsa's brand of football good enough for Leeds United

Posted: Fri Jun 15, 2018 12:15 pm
by Clacton white
I think a massive boost in season ticket sales . Last years/season gates were up after an impressive season under Monk and a bloody good start . Imagine the expectation with Bielsa and some marquee singings ( which /I imagine he has had assurances of ) ....will results match expectations - I certainly hope so . I think between now and start of season is going to be very interesting indeed . I think s totally different kind of player would want to play for Leeds under Bielsa than those who would play for Heck . I am myself feeling very positive about things right now . that isn't usually a good sign . Lets hope Radz has learnt from last season - and Orta too . If nothing else this appointment is a serious statement to the rest of the division that the club is now serious about going up and not just arseing around hoping to get lucky .