Is Radrizanni's "brand" of football good enough for Leeds United?

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Ontolly
Joined: Mon Feb 11, 2008 9:36 pm
Location: Shrewsbury

Re: Is Radrizanni's "brand" of football good enough for Leeds United?

Postby Ontolly » Wed Apr 08, 2020 7:27 pm

To be clear. Not dicking about costs. If we were dicking about then that would also cost. But we are not dicking about and that costs more. Probably.
If we don't dick about and go up then what's the problem? It's not as if we would go up with dicking about. If your argument is about us not dicking about and not going up then the only other scenario is dicking about and not going up and we tried that for fucking years.

I prefer this position :cheers:
The only thing we knew for sure about Henry Porter was that his name wasn't Henry Porter.

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Bobbycollins
Joined: Sun Jun 23, 2019 7:52 pm
Location: Leeds

Re: Is Radrizanni's "brand" of football good enough for Leeds United?

Postby Bobbycollins » Wed Apr 08, 2020 7:34 pm

Yeboah wrote:
Bobbycollins wrote:There are only two aspects of the accounts that give me cause for concern:
1) the statement from Kinnear that Radz has invested "to deliver his vision of making Leeds United great again". The sentiment is OK but surely he could have found a better phrase?
2) The TV revenue of just under £1.5m is an insult and reflects very badly on those Championship clubs that rushed to agree such a poor deal with the broadcasters. For those people who are shocked and/or worried by the accounts, I suggest you look at Everton, who had an average gate slightly higher than Leeds at 39,043 and made a loss of £111,815m in the same period to June 2019. Everton received £21.2m for the 18 occasions their games were live on domestic TV and a further £34.4m for the remainder of TV revenue that was shared equally between the EPL clubs, i.e. they received greater domestic TV revenue than the entire turnover at Leeds.

As a fan, I am more than happy for Radz to invest his cash in the club in the not unreasonable hope of a profit when he sells a successful club to new owners with deeper pockets.


Does the £60+m we owe in the next 12 months not bother you?


No. The figure is actually £53m but that total includes £12m advance payments for tickets and sponsorship and £8m owed to Group undertakings, so the £53m will not be paid in the 12 months to June 2020. Total assets less current liabilities are positive £21m. In the unreal world of football finance, this is not a car crash.

Yeboah
Joined: Tue Jul 31, 2012 11:06 am

Re: Is Radrizanni's "brand" of football good enough for Leeds United?

Postby Yeboah » Wed Apr 08, 2020 10:02 pm

Bobbycollins wrote:
Yeboah wrote:
Bobbycollins wrote:There are only two aspects of the accounts that give me cause for concern:
1) the statement from Kinnear that Radz has invested "to deliver his vision of making Leeds United great again". The sentiment is OK but surely he could have found a better phrase?
2) The TV revenue of just under £1.5m is an insult and reflects very badly on those Championship clubs that rushed to agree such a poor deal with the broadcasters. For those people who are shocked and/or worried by the accounts, I suggest you look at Everton, who had an average gate slightly higher than Leeds at 39,043 and made a loss of £111,815m in the same period to June 2019. Everton received £21.2m for the 18 occasions their games were live on domestic TV and a further £34.4m for the remainder of TV revenue that was shared equally between the EPL clubs, i.e. they received greater domestic TV revenue than the entire turnover at Leeds.

As a fan, I am more than happy for Radz to invest his cash in the club in the not unreasonable hope of a profit when he sells a successful club to new owners with deeper pockets.


Does the £60+m we owe in the next 12 months not bother you?


No. The figure is actually £53m but that total includes £12m advance payments for tickets and sponsorship and £8m owed to Group undertakings, so the £53m will not be paid in the 12 months to June 2020. Total assets less current liabilities are positive £21m. In the unreal world of football finance, this is not a car crash.


Does the monies owed not include the money ‘committed’ to Costa?

And asset values, which include players on diminishing return contracts are an arbitrary guess vs real world values. Hopefully we have a lot of players on the ‘right’ side of that equation!

BARE-NAKED-LADY
Joined: Fri Feb 15, 2008 6:29 pm
Location: LEEDS

Re: Is Radrizanni's "brand" of football good enough for Leeds United?

Postby BARE-NAKED-LADY » Thu Apr 09, 2020 6:56 am

A more comprehensive review from Phil in the Athletic

The first conversation between Andrea Radrizzani and Victor Orta about Marcelo Bielsa — a throwaway chat in the back of a car one night — was all about the feasibility of courting him. Would Bielsa be receptive to the idea of coaching Leeds United? Was he likely to return their calls? Orta made the suggestion but expressed doubts about it. Radrizzani told him to try.

The elephant in the room, though, was not Bielsa’s reaction. The real issue was money. If Bielsa was willing to get on a plane, Leeds would have to pay him accordingly and far above the wage of less than £500,000 agreed with his predecessor Paul Heckingbottom.

Moreover, they would have to roll the dice: fatten the wage bill at Elland Road, sustain higher losses and rely on Radrizzani to cover the shortfall. Bielsa on a mid-table budget made no sense. As someone senior at the club said when the Argentine landed: “We could pay far less to finish 15th. That isn’t difficult.”

Leeds’ accounts for the 2018-19 financial year, published online on Wednesday morning, show the extent to which they and Radrizzani stretched themselves in Bielsa’s first season and allude to the way in which they are still stretching themselves. Overall losses jumped from £4 million to £21 million and the wage bill came in at £46 million, up £15 million on the 2017-18 season.

Leeds are setting records with their annual turnover in the Championship (£48.9 million in these accounts and set to rise to around £60 million in the 2019-20 results) but salaries accounted for 94 per cent of that money. The club, in keeping with the trend in England’s second division, are heavily reliant on shareholder support.

In short, Leeds’ losses are manageable while Radrizzani or another investor soaks them up but the deficit of £21 million reiterates a comment made by the owner on the day he first invested in 2017: that there is only so long he will finance Leeds in the Championship. There are no parachute payments to feed on and the club have already inflated their revenue to unique levels below the Premier League. Overspending was seen as their only means of actively competing to escape from the EFL. The question in these scenarios is always how long losses so high can be maintained.

The hope for Leeds — and until the suspension of the season last month, their hope was very real — was that the sun was setting on a 10-year stretch in the Championship and Premier League cash was coming. Now they wait to see if their strategy will be realised.

The figures contained in the latest accounts also explain two things vividly: why it was that Leeds moved quickly to negotiate a wage deferral with their players and senior staff after the COVID-19 shutdown and why it is that so much is made at Elland Road of the EFL’s Profit and Sustainability (P&S) limits.

Sources at Leeds have told The Athletic that the club continue to be P&S compliant but the loss of £21 million in 2018-19 will inevitably be followed by another sizeable deficit in the 2019-20 results (which will be published next March). Not all losses count towards P&S calculations but in terms of those which do apply, the EFL limits Championship sides to a maximum shortfall of £39 million over three years. When Leeds say that they are right on the line, the numbers in writing don’t contradict them. The recent coronavirus wage deferral — bringing players down to a maximum weekly wage of £6,000 a week until football resumes — will also aid the cash flow of a club who, in 2018-19, paid out £3.8 million a month in salaries.

Turnover is where the business at Leeds looks most healthy, with income well above the Championship’s average. In all, it jumped by £8 million. Gate receipts were up as a result of higher average attendances; the Bielsa effect. Merchandising revenue grew by more than £3 million.

What jumps out every year in Leeds’ results is the meagre amount of cash they earn from television rights deals versus the large broadcast audiences they pull in. Their total TV earnings were £1.5 million, including £100,000 a match for the home games which were televised. In the Premier League, individual home fixtures pay an additional fee of £1.6 million. The difference is vast.

An operating loss of £36 million was reduced to an overall loss of £21 million by the £15 million raised through player sales, most of it coming from Ronaldo Vieira and Jack Clarke. Subsequent deals to sell Pontus Jansson, Kemar Roofe and Bailey Peacock-Farrell last summer will fall into the 2019-20 accounts.

But there is no attempt at Leeds to pretend that the club are living within their means. Leeds’ parent company, Aser Group, tackled the 2018-19 losses with net loans of £17 million, money which is effectively coming from Radrizzani himself. The accounts stated that Aser would “continue to financially support” Leeds through the 2019-20 year and would not call in any money owed to it during that period either.

The same goes for the lease of Elland Road, United’s stadium which Radrizzani purchased in 2017 through a separate firm, Greenfield Investment Pte. Leeds were granted an initial rent-free period of 33 months but The Athletic understands that Radrizzani will take no money out of the club in lease payments for as long as they are in the Championship and for as long as he is injecting capital. As one source at Leeds said, there is no logic in him withdrawing cash via rent when much of the money going into the accounts is his in the first place. Accrued rent is listed at £3 million but for accounting reasons, is being spread for the duration of the lease, which runs to June 2032. Leeds say that to date, Radrizzani has received no rent money at all.

There were other costs too, including more than £2 million on improving facilities at Elland Road and Thorp Arch. Part of that expenditure relates to the upgrades Bielsa asked for at the club’s training ground: a running track, camera equipment for analysis, the recommissioning of the swimming pool. The drain on the club’s cash reserves is shown by £2.9 million at the end of the 2017-18 year dropping to less than £500,000 in the following 12 months and Leeds are chipping away at the loan owed to Gulf Finance House, the Bahraini bank which ran the club between 2012 and 2014. As of June 2019, £4.2 million was owed to GFH and due to be repaid in installments until 2029, the legacy of a regime which quit Elland Road six years ago.

Promotion to the Premier League would not come for free, either. Bonuses in the event that Leeds go up stood at almost £20 million as of June 2019 but Radrizzani and the club will see their income multiply many times if they make the top flight.

That was the whole point of tempting Bielsa to a meeting in Buenos Aires and asking him to have a go: the calculation that a coach so adept, so driven and so expensive was the best route to climbing out of the money pit. It went without saying that he would come at a cost and he has. But Leeds could yet find that the risk pays off.

(Photo: Mike Egerton/PA Images via Getty Images)
B-N-L

BARE-NAKED-LADY
Joined: Fri Feb 15, 2008 6:29 pm
Location: LEEDS

Re: Is Radrizanni's "brand" of football good enough for Leeds United?

Postby BARE-NAKED-LADY » Thu Apr 09, 2020 6:59 am

To Yeboah

topbin wrote:Saw something online earlier this week about conspiracy theorists, the only question that will stump them is "What would it take for you to change your mind on this?" - as it throws the ball in their court and highlights that they wouldn't accept anything which disproves their theories.

Obviously they'll still back themselves into a corner/tunnel, but it usually shuts up the argument in person.
B-N-L

Yeboah
Joined: Tue Jul 31, 2012 11:06 am

Re: Is Radrizanni's "brand" of football good enough for Leeds United?

Postby Yeboah » Thu Apr 09, 2020 12:21 pm

BARE-NAKED-LADY wrote:To Yeboah

topbin wrote:Saw something online earlier this week about conspiracy theorists, the only question that will stump them is "What would it take for you to change your mind on this?" - as it throws the ball in their court and highlights that they wouldn't accept anything which disproves their theories.

Obviously they'll still back themselves into a corner/tunnel, but it usually shuts up the argument in person.


You would need to explain to me what ‘conspiracy theory’ we are talking about.

Yeboah
Joined: Tue Jul 31, 2012 11:06 am

Re: Is Radrizanni's "brand" of football good enough for Leeds United?

Postby Yeboah » Thu Apr 09, 2020 12:21 pm

BARE-NAKED-LADY wrote:A more comprehensive review from Phil in the Athletic

The first conversation between Andrea Radrizzani and Victor Orta about Marcelo Bielsa — a throwaway chat in the back of a car one night — was all about the feasibility of courting him. Would Bielsa be receptive to the idea of coaching Leeds United? Was he likely to return their calls? Orta made the suggestion but expressed doubts about it. Radrizzani told him to try.

The elephant in the room, though, was not Bielsa’s reaction. The real issue was money. If Bielsa was willing to get on a plane, Leeds would have to pay him accordingly and far above the wage of less than £500,000 agreed with his predecessor Paul Heckingbottom.

Moreover, they would have to roll the dice: fatten the wage bill at Elland Road, sustain higher losses and rely on Radrizzani to cover the shortfall. Bielsa on a mid-table budget made no sense. As someone senior at the club said when the Argentine landed: “We could pay far less to finish 15th. That isn’t difficult.”

Leeds’ accounts for the 2018-19 financial year, published online on Wednesday morning, show the extent to which they and Radrizzani stretched themselves in Bielsa’s first season and allude to the way in which they are still stretching themselves. Overall losses jumped from £4 million to £21 million and the wage bill came in at £46 million, up £15 million on the 2017-18 season.

Leeds are setting records with their annual turnover in the Championship (£48.9 million in these accounts and set to rise to around £60 million in the 2019-20 results) but salaries accounted for 94 per cent of that money. The club, in keeping with the trend in England’s second division, are heavily reliant on shareholder support.

In short, Leeds’ losses are manageable while Radrizzani or another investor soaks them up but the deficit of £21 million reiterates a comment made by the owner on the day he first invested in 2017: that there is only so long he will finance Leeds in the Championship. There are no parachute payments to feed on and the club have already inflated their revenue to unique levels below the Premier League. Overspending was seen as their only means of actively competing to escape from the EFL. The question in these scenarios is always how long losses so high can be maintained.

The hope for Leeds — and until the suspension of the season last month, their hope was very real — was that the sun was setting on a 10-year stretch in the Championship and Premier League cash was coming. Now they wait to see if their strategy will be realised.

The figures contained in the latest accounts also explain two things vividly: why it was that Leeds moved quickly to negotiate a wage deferral with their players and senior staff after the COVID-19 shutdown and why it is that so much is made at Elland Road of the EFL’s Profit and Sustainability (P&S) limits.

Sources at Leeds have told The Athletic that the club continue to be P&S compliant but the loss of £21 million in 2018-19 will inevitably be followed by another sizeable deficit in the 2019-20 results (which will be published next March). Not all losses count towards P&S calculations but in terms of those which do apply, the EFL limits Championship sides to a maximum shortfall of £39 million over three years. When Leeds say that they are right on the line, the numbers in writing don’t contradict them. The recent coronavirus wage deferral — bringing players down to a maximum weekly wage of £6,000 a week until football resumes — will also aid the cash flow of a club who, in 2018-19, paid out £3.8 million a month in salaries.

Turnover is where the business at Leeds looks most healthy, with income well above the Championship’s average. In all, it jumped by £8 million. Gate receipts were up as a result of higher average attendances; the Bielsa effect. Merchandising revenue grew by more than £3 million.

What jumps out every year in Leeds’ results is the meagre amount of cash they earn from television rights deals versus the large broadcast audiences they pull in. Their total TV earnings were £1.5 million, including £100,000 a match for the home games which were televised. In the Premier League, individual home fixtures pay an additional fee of £1.6 million. The difference is vast.

An operating loss of £36 million was reduced to an overall loss of £21 million by the £15 million raised through player sales, most of it coming from Ronaldo Vieira and Jack Clarke. Subsequent deals to sell Pontus Jansson, Kemar Roofe and Bailey Peacock-Farrell last summer will fall into the 2019-20 accounts.

But there is no attempt at Leeds to pretend that the club are living within their means. Leeds’ parent company, Aser Group, tackled the 2018-19 losses with net loans of £17 million, money which is effectively coming from Radrizzani himself. The accounts stated that Aser would “continue to financially support” Leeds through the 2019-20 year and would not call in any money owed to it during that period either.

The same goes for the lease of Elland Road, United’s stadium which Radrizzani purchased in 2017 through a separate firm, Greenfield Investment Pte. Leeds were granted an initial rent-free period of 33 months but The Athletic understands that Radrizzani will take no money out of the club in lease payments for as long as they are in the Championship and for as long as he is injecting capital. As one source at Leeds said, there is no logic in him withdrawing cash via rent when much of the money going into the accounts is his in the first place. Accrued rent is listed at £3 million but for accounting reasons, is being spread for the duration of the lease, which runs to June 2032. Leeds say that to date, Radrizzani has received no rent money at all.

There were other costs too, including more than £2 million on improving facilities at Elland Road and Thorp Arch. Part of that expenditure relates to the upgrades Bielsa asked for at the club’s training ground: a running track, camera equipment for analysis, the recommissioning of the swimming pool. The drain on the club’s cash reserves is shown by £2.9 million at the end of the 2017-18 year dropping to less than £500,000 in the following 12 months and Leeds are chipping away at the loan owed to Gulf Finance House, the Bahraini bank which ran the club between 2012 and 2014. As of June 2019, £4.2 million was owed to GFH and due to be repaid in installments until 2029, the legacy of a regime which quit Elland Road six years ago.

Promotion to the Premier League would not come for free, either. Bonuses in the event that Leeds go up stood at almost £20 million as of June 2019 but Radrizzani and the club will see their income multiply many times if they make the top flight.

That was the whole point of tempting Bielsa to a meeting in Buenos Aires and asking him to have a go: the calculation that a coach so adept, so driven and so expensive was the best route to climbing out of the money pit. It went without saying that he would come at a cost and he has. But Leeds could yet find that the risk pays off.

(Photo: Mike Egerton/PA Images via Getty Images)


Does he not mention the debt position anywhere?

Yeboah
Joined: Tue Jul 31, 2012 11:06 am

Re: Is Radrizanni's "brand" of football good enough for Leeds United?

Postby Yeboah » Fri Apr 10, 2020 12:07 pm

Yeboah wrote:
BARE-NAKED-LADY wrote:To Yeboah

topbin wrote:Saw something online earlier this week about conspiracy theorists, the only question that will stump them is "What would it take for you to change your mind on this?" - as it throws the ball in their court and highlights that they wouldn't accept anything which disproves their theories.

Obviously they'll still back themselves into a corner/tunnel, but it usually shuts up the argument in person.


You would need to explain to me what ‘conspiracy theory’ we are talking about.


Shall I take a guess or can you answer the question? I would usually ignore it but you did specifically address it to me.

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Quiffy
Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 6:56 pm

Re: Is Radrizanni's "brand" of football good enough for Leeds United?

Postby Quiffy » Sun May 24, 2020 7:42 pm

can't remember who used to hark on about the 5 year plan, was it mr r or yeboah? anyway apparently today is day 1 of year 4 and 'leeds live' has done a recap, which is kind of them. I've 2 reasons for posting this, firstly to remind people of what was actually said, which seems to have become blurred and secondly because my bad memory appreciates the context it gives. There is nothing new or startling, it's just a useful summary.

On May 23, 2017, Leeds United confirmed that Andrea Radrizzani had completed his full takeover at Leeds United.

The Italian had come in alongside his compatriot Massimo Cellino in January of that year and following the club's late-season wobble which saw them miss out on the playoffs under Garry Monk, he assumed full control.

That meant the often-chaotic Cellino era was over and following a string of undesirable ownership regimes, fans had fresh hope that an end to their Premier League exile was on the way.

These hopes were somewhat hit two days later when Monk left the club, but what it did was mean Radrizzani had a completely clean slate to deal with.

New arrivals Victor Orta and Angus Kinnear were joined in the boardroom by Ivan Bravo and the new hierarchy quickly got to work.

On the eve of the new season Radrizzani did his first round of media interviews, spelling out his Elland Road vision to the national press.

One of the lines that got the most traction from the media was the timeframe he set himself for succeess.

“I am giving a maximum of five years to be in the Premier League,” he said in August 2017. “If I try and I am not able then it is probably best for someone else to try, maybe with more resources than me.

“If I go up I’m not selling. I am young, I can stay here for 20 years and enjoy. It’s a dream; why build all of this if I then have to leave? If however in five years I don’t succeed … obviously there is a cycle for everything. It could be the end of the cycle if I realise I am not good for this job. Life is full of surprises but now I can’t wait to be in [the Premier League].”

Three of these five years are now in the books, so how is Radrizzani's five-year plan shaping up?

Clearly, when he arrived at Leeds, Radrizzani knew immediate promotion was far too ambitious.

The immediate aim that first year was be to improve on the seventh-place finish in 2016-17, which would have brought a play-off spot. This would have been something to build on and momentum to be taken into years two and three.

Looking back, that first season will go down as a learning experience.

Radrizzani has plenty of friends in Silicon Valley and the golden rule of start-up culture is that you must fail before you can succeed. Lessons are learned, changes are made and success (sometimes) follows.

Certainly mistakes were made in that first season at Elland Road. Thomas Christiansen got off to a quick start, but as the season went on it became clear that he was the wrong man in the wrong job at the wrong time. Paul Heckingbottom's subsequent appointment was another lesson learned.

Radrizzani and his management team now had first-hand experience of how big this job is, how unforgiving the Championship is and the strength of personality that you need in the dugout if you are to put up a decent promotion fight.

Lessons were also learned off the pitch. Radrizzani's early repurchase of the Elland Road stadium meant he had credit in the bank which meant the club were able to ride out the storm of 'salute' crest debacle that had resulted in widespread mocking from the footballing world.

A Twitter rant in the closing stages of a 3-0 home defeat to champions-elect Wolves was another misstep, as was the end-of-season tour to Myanmar, which brought widespread condemnation.

A 13th place finish that ended with a series of lacklustre performances meant there was little to shout about on the first anniversary of his takeover as the five-year plan had gone into reverse.

Action was clearly needed, and that's what happened as Radrizzani set about learning from his first-year mistakes.

Heckingbottom was gone soon after the squad touched back down from Myanmar and the club worked on an almighty upgrade.

Help from some of his aforementioned Silicon Valley pals came in the form of a minority investment from the San Francisco 49ers, with that cash going towards the hiring of former Chile and Argentina national team boss Marcelo Bielsa - a target that beggared belief when news first broke in Spain.

Out was the plan of hiring an inexperienced coach and gambling on potential, in was the hiring of one of world football's most respected and single-minded coaches. It was a genuine coup for the club expectations for year two were cranked up accordingly, albeit with a few question marks over how long it would take Bielsa to adapt the unique challenges of the English second tier.

Things changed at boardroom level too. Year two saw no repeat of the PR disasters that beset his rookie campaign, while Bielsa was given all the tools he needed to do his job.

With minimal changes to the playing squad, Leeds United were a different beast on the pitch in 2018-19. The tone was set in the first minutes of their season-opening win over pre-season promotion favourites Stoke City and Leeds only really let their grip on the division slip in the closing weeks.

While the play-off semi-final defeat to Derby County was a crushing blow, huge progress had been made. Bielsa quickly agreed to come back for a second season and continuity was the watchword of that summer.

Any long-term plan needs a combination progress and continuity to be successful, and at the end of year two under Radrizzani, Leeds had both.

On the pitch, the 2019-20 campaign has seen more of the same. Leeds' high-octane style is now even-more entwined among a tightly-knit squad, while off-the-pitch, Leeds are being run in a much more professional manner than was the case in recent years.

Radrizzani would have wanted to have been celebrating the end of his third year having just won promotion to the Premier League, but events have overtaken this.

A global pandemic is not something any club is likely to have given too much thought to before covid-19 began its spread around the world earlier this year, but it is hard to see how Leeds could have handled it better.

After seeing the devastation is was causing in his native Lombardy, Radrizzani ensured his club acted quickly, closing down Thorp Arch promptly, taking steps to ensure his squad were able to keep fit by supplying equipment and personalised training sessions and also becoming the first side in the country to agree a wage deferral. A clear and consistent message of wanting to complete the season on the pitch, while also preaching safety has also helped.

Limited training is set to commence on Monday, and if the action does return and Leeds are able to pick up where they left off and claim a place in the Premier League, Radrizzani will have pulled off his five-year plan with two seasons to spare.


from https://www.leeds-live.co.uk/sport/leeds-united/andrea-radrizzanis-five-year-plan-18304257
increasing doubt, decreasing hope, even my imaginary friend went and changed his mind.

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welshwhite
Joined: Mon Feb 11, 2008 9:15 pm

Re: Is Radrizanni's "brand" of football good enough for Leeds United?

Postby welshwhite » Sun May 24, 2020 8:51 pm

Those four years have gone quickly, he set out a five year plan so it's no surprise that the 49ers and QSI are hovering around waiting to buy us out.

I hope he keeps to his word about the FYP and leaves before the end of it because all in all he's been sort of Ok, out of his depth for a club of our size of course but an Ok guardian until someone capable turns up.

My thoughts are he got lucky with Bielsa, without him it would definitely have been five wasted years.

We'd have finished about tenth this season without Marcelo, under the ownership of Radz and his side-kick, Victor.

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dirty leeds
Joined: Mon Feb 11, 2008 12:13 pm
Location: London

Re: Is Radrizanni's "brand" of football good enough for Leeds United?

Postby dirty leeds » Mon May 25, 2020 7:39 am

welshwhite wrote:Those four years have gone quickly, he set out a five year plan so it's no surprise that the 49ers and QSI are hovering around waiting to buy us out.

I hope he keeps to his word about the FYP and leaves before the end of it because all in all he's been sort of Ok, out of his depth for a club of our size of course but an Ok guardian until someone capable turns up.

My thoughts are he got lucky with Bielsa, without him it would definitely have been five wasted years.

We'd have finished about tenth this season without Marcelo, under the ownership of Radz and his side-kick, Victor.


Thank you, Baked Potato.

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welshwhite
Joined: Mon Feb 11, 2008 9:15 pm

Re: Is Radrizanni's "brand" of football good enough for Leeds United?

Postby welshwhite » Mon May 25, 2020 8:40 am

dirty leeds wrote:
welshwhite wrote:Those four years have gone quickly, he set out a five year plan so it's no surprise that the 49ers and QSI are hovering around waiting to buy us out.

I hope he keeps to his word about the FYP and leaves before the end of it because all in all he's been sort of Ok, out of his depth for a club of our size of course but an Ok guardian until someone capable turns up.

My thoughts are he got lucky with Bielsa, without him it would definitely have been five wasted years.

We'd have finished about tenth this season without Marcelo, under the ownership of Radz and his side-kick, Victor.


Thank you, Baked Potato.


No problem, John Sullivan.

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dirty leeds
Joined: Mon Feb 11, 2008 12:13 pm
Location: London

Re: Is Radrizanni's "brand" of football good enough for Leeds United?

Postby dirty leeds » Mon May 25, 2020 8:43 am

welshwhite wrote:
dirty leeds wrote:
welshwhite wrote:Those four years have gone quickly, he set out a five year plan so it's no surprise that the 49ers and QSI are hovering around waiting to buy us out.

I hope he keeps to his word about the FYP and leaves before the end of it because all in all he's been sort of Ok, out of his depth for a club of our size of course but an Ok guardian until someone capable turns up.

My thoughts are he got lucky with Bielsa, without him it would definitely have been five wasted years.

We'd have finished about tenth this season without Marcelo, under the ownership of Radz and his side-kick, Victor.


Thank you, Baked Potato.


No problem, John Sullivan.


Hah! Had to look up who he was.
You got to watch Only Fools & Horses then? That bit where he falls behind the bar, eh? And the one with the chandelier. :mrgreen:

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jackos
Joined: Mon Feb 11, 2008 7:49 am
Location: Stockholm

Re: Is Radrizanni's "brand" of football good enough for Leeds United?

Postby jackos » Mon May 25, 2020 8:46 am

welshwhite wrote:Those four years have gone quickly.


day 1 of year 4 :thumbl: :thumbl:

No need to thank me :salute:

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Ontolly
Joined: Mon Feb 11, 2008 9:36 pm
Location: Shrewsbury

Re: Is Radrizanni's "brand" of football good enough for Leeds United?

Postby Ontolly » Mon May 25, 2020 8:55 am

dirty leeds wrote:
welshwhite wrote:
dirty leeds wrote:Hah! Had to look up who he was.
You got to watch Only Fools & Horses then? That bit where he falls behind the bar, eh? And the one with the chandelier. :mrgreen:


'You don't know what ethics are'
'Course I do. They make model airplanes'

:mrgreen: :mrgreen:
The only thing we knew for sure about Henry Porter was that his name wasn't Henry Porter.

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welshwhite
Joined: Mon Feb 11, 2008 9:15 pm

Re: Is Radrizanni's "brand" of football good enough for Leeds United?

Postby welshwhite » Mon May 25, 2020 9:02 am

jackos wrote:
welshwhite wrote:Those four years have gone quickly.


day 1 of year 4 :thumbl: :thumbl:


This has been a fucker of a year for bad news.

We simply have to get promoted this season by whatever means.
If we don't and Bielsa fucks off and Radz stays for the remainder of his FYP we'll go back to being a mid-table side with no chance of even the playoffs.

We've been very fortunate that Bielsa has been able to polish the turds that Radz and Victor have gathered here.

Most of our best players this season were left here by Cellino.
One thing is for sure, he'd have not paid 22 million quid for Bamford & Costa.

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welshwhite
Joined: Mon Feb 11, 2008 9:15 pm

Re: Is Radrizanni's "brand" of football good enough for Leeds United?

Postby welshwhite » Mon May 25, 2020 9:12 am

dirty leeds wrote:You got to watch Only Fools & Horses then? :


Nah, I was bored so I just made it up.

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dirty leeds
Joined: Mon Feb 11, 2008 12:13 pm
Location: London

Re: Is Radrizanni's "brand" of football good enough for Leeds United?

Postby dirty leeds » Mon May 25, 2020 9:13 am

welshwhite wrote:
dirty leeds wrote:You got to watch Only Fools & Horses then? :


Nah, I was bored so I just made it up.


:thumbl:


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